The Winter of Life

  by: Mary Dow Brine (1816-1913)

 

 

 

 

As down the frosty road we came,
My man and I together,
We talked of this, and smiled at that,
Nor felt the chilling weather.
For side by side we trudged along,
Each thought the other sharing,
And in each other's company
The wintry breezes daring.

 

The sky above was cold and gray,
The earth below was dreary,
But home was near, and love was warm,
Altho' the way seemed weary.
John had but me, I had but John,
Life's twilight skies to brighten,
But every sorrow we had borne,
Some blessing came to lighten.

 

We passed the hillside on our way,
Where 'neath the sod were sleeping
The four dear children God had spared
But shortly to our keeping.
We looked that way with wistful eyes,
Tear-dimmed with sudden yearning,
As backward o'er the lapse of time
Our hearts--our thoughts--were turning.

 

"Dear soul, cheer up!" John softly said,
"They only wait above us!
Are we not glad no parting waits
Us here for those that love us?"
Into his dear old face I looked,
No longer then repining:
For John had me, and I had John;
Love's sunbeams still were shining.

 

The summer joys long since were past,
And winter's snows were o'er us;
The twilight sky was cold and drear,
And night was just before us.
But though the way so weary seemed,
Yet John and I were merry:
For said I not that home was near?
And hearts and thoughts grew cheery.

 

And thinking o'er that walk today--
When John and I together,
Side close by side, came down the road,
All thro' the frosty weather--
I think of how, life's journey trod,
With trust forsaken never,
We've nearly reached at night that home
Where dwelleth rest forever.


   More poems by Mary Dow Brine